For Resource Managers

Department of Land and Natural Resources Job Listings

Latest Update (February 16, 2017): 
Forester IV/V Fire Protection Forester on Oahu is open with continuous recruitment. Applications should still be submitted as soon as possible. For questions, please contact: Robert.D.Hauff@hawaii.gov

"People who work for the Department of Land and Natural Resources are committed to fulfilling the agency’s mission of managing and conserving the state’s natural and cultural resources for future generations. With nearly 900 employees working throughout the state, job opportunities within the department require various levels of education and expertise ranging from a high school education up through advanced degrees. If you are interested in pursuing a career as a conservation enforcement officer, aquatic or wildlife biologist, environmental engineer, archaeologist or cultural historian, the Department of Land and Natural Resources is the place for you."

Fuels and Wildfire Behavior - Training Module

"This PFX Training Module is a self-paced mini-course that includes short self-assessments throughout. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Understand how fuel type, characteristics, arrangement, and environment affects fire risk and fire behavior.
  • Be able to identify hazardous fuels types and arrangements on a landscape. "

Western Oahu CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 Western Oahu Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_Western Oahu_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

Upcountry Maui CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 Upcountry Maui Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

UMCWPP Plan with appendices 161230.compressed cover page.png

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_Upcountry Maui_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

South Maui CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 South Maui Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

SM CWPP Plan w appendices 161229.compressed cover photo.png

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_South Maui_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

North Kona CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 North Kona Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

NKCWPP plan w appendices 161229.compressed_cover photo.png

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_North Kona_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

Molokai CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 Molokai Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

MoCWPP plan w appendices 161229.compressed_Page_001.jpg

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_Molokai_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

Kauai CWPP (2016 Update)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 Kauai Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) Update.

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

KCWPPU plan with appendices 161226.compressed_Page_001.jpg

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_Kauai Update_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

Why HWMO? Infographic

Find out what our staff is saying about HWMO and visualize the projects we have been working on the past few years in our new infographic. 

Prevent Wildfires to Protect Our Ocean (VIDEO)

 

In 2016, Maui had its worst wildfire season in many years. With barely any vegetation left in the burned areas to hold down silty soils, a mid-September storm rained down on the burned lands and carried trash and debris through our watersheds and out into the ocean. This video tells the story post-fire flooding and its impacts on our communities, lands, and waters. 

Footage of post-fire flooding was filmed in West Maui on the days following the September 13th storm. 

Share this video with your friends, 'ohana, coworkers and everyone else you know who cares about our oceans.

And remember to share the message: 
PREVENT WILDFIRES TO PROTECT OUR OCEAN

Credits:
Pablo Beimler - Producer, Writer, Videographer, Editor, Narrator
Elizabeth Pickett - Writer
Gordon Firestein - Launiupoko Videos
Doris Lang - Launiupoko Videos
Seri Niimi-Burch - Airport Fire Video

Music by Bensound.com - "Piano Moment"

This video was made possible through the support provided by U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, under the terms of Grant No. 16-DG-11052012-146. The opinions expressed in this video are those of the author(s) and does not necessarily reflect views of the U.S. Forest Service. USDA is an equal opportunity provider.