For Educators

Introduction: Wildfire Basics for Professionals, Educator Series

Welcome to Wildfire Basics for Professionals: Educator series. This educator series consists of 5 training modules that are geared towards teachers interested in incorporating wildfire awareness and information into curriculum. Incorporating some of these techniques and ideas into curriculum can help students become more aware of wildfire danger, and how to mitigate wildfire risks.

Module 4: Wildfire Basics for Professionals, Educator Series

This module gives an overview of the KNOW Fire curriculum structure that will be presented in greater detail during module 5. It displays the meaning behind WHY it is important to teach wildfire concepts in a particular order, and which concepts are best to apply to different ability levels.

Module 5: Wildfire Basics for Professionals, Educator Series

This module goes over each of the curriculum activities that we recommend teaching to students. The activities are meant to be fun, challenging, and educational methods to help students learn that they can be a part of mitigating wildfires in their community. This module displays some effective methods that can be used to teach students about the many dimensions of wildfire mitigation.

2018-19 Rapid Assessment of Vegetation Management Results

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In 2015, HWMO’s Technical Advisory Committee, comprised of more than 35 fire and natural resource experts from across the state, discussed Hawaii’s lack of consolidated landscape-level information on vegetative fire fuels treatments. 

To start to fill the gap, HWMO conducted a Rapid Mapping Assessment and facilitated Collaborative Action Planning on Vegetation Management in 2018-19 to:

  • Better understand all of the important hazard reduction already happening by diverse land managers;

  • Identify and prioritize actions that address the island-wide fire issue to optimize expenditures and efforts and maximize protection at the landscape-scale;

  • To kick-start collaboration, information sharing, and integrate fire-thinking into current activities to address the cross-boundary fire risk.

We thank State Division of Forestry and Wildlife, University of Hawaiʻi CTAHR Cooperative Extension, and Pacific Fire Exchange for their collaborative support on this project. Funding was provided by Hawaiʻi State Grant-in-Aid Program, 2016, and the U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, under the terms of Grant No. 16-11052012-146 and No. 17-DG-11052012-143. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

We also thank the many mapping participants, workshop attendees, and survey respondents who made this all possible!

The preliminary results of the Rapid Mapping Assessment and Collaborative Action Planning can be found below.

**Full Report Coming Soon**



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"Four Friends of Fire" Video

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A short PSA with animated characters to educate people about the four key elements that dictate fire behavior universally.

If we're going to live with fire, we'd better get to know it. In this first installment of the series, we meet four key drivers of bushfire risk. With thanks to the University of Wollongong, the University of Melbourne, Rockshelf Productions and David Shooter.

Hawaii Wildfire Interactive Webapp

Click above to check out the HWMO Webapp

Click above to check out the HWMO Webapp

Why a Hawaii Wildfire webapp?

As an organization that serves all who live, work, or visit the Hawaiian Islands and parts of the Western Pacific, we want to make wildfire-related information readily available at your fingertips. We hope this app will be useful for you to learn more about the wildfire hazards in your own area so that you will be better equipped to take action in your community.

What does the Hawaii Wildfire webapp do?

The Hawaii Wildfire webapp visualizes wildfire data across Hawaii. It has four types of data: fire history, community hazard assessments, community input information, and census data.

Knowledge is power!

We want to say a big thank you to Niklas Lollo and Evangeline McGlynn, PhD candidates at the University of California, Berkeley, for developing the app in conjunction with Data Sciences for the 21st Century. Their hard work and dedication to this app no doubt shows in the final result.

If you have any questions or feedback, you can e-mail HWMO at admin@hawaiiwildfire.org or call (808) 885-0900.

Wildfire LOOKOUT! Flyer

Click to enlarge the front page of the flyer.

Click to enlarge the front page of the flyer.

Wildfires are a frequent and significant hazard across Hawaii.

Help do your part by preventing wildfire and following these 14 easy action ideas to prepare your home, family, and community.