Community Wildfire Protection Planning (CWPP)

Hawaii Wildfire Interactive Webapp

Click above to check out the HWMO Webapp

Click above to check out the HWMO Webapp

Why a Hawaii Wildfire webapp?

As an organization that serves all who live, work, or visit the Hawaiian Islands and parts of the Western Pacific, we want to make wildfire-related information readily available at your fingertips. We hope this app will be useful for you to learn more about the wildfire hazards in your own area so that you will be better equipped to take action in your community.

What does the Hawaii Wildfire webapp do?

The Hawaii Wildfire webapp visualizes wildfire data across Hawaii. It has four types of data: fire history, community hazard assessments, community input information, and census data.

Knowledge is power!

We want to say a big thank you to Niklas Lollo and Evangeline McGlynn, PhD candidates at the University of California, Berkeley, for developing the app in conjunction with Data Sciences for the 21st Century. Their hard work and dedication to this app no doubt shows in the final result.

If you have any questions or feedback, you can e-mail HWMO at admin@hawaiiwildfire.org or call (808) 885-0900.

CWPP Overview Sheet

HWMO has helped develop Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) for most of the priority fire-prone regions of Hawaii. The plans assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties.

Western Oahu CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 Western Oahu Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_Western Oahu_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

Upcountry Maui CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 Upcountry Maui Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

UMCWPP Plan with appendices 161230.compressed cover page.png

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_Upcountry Maui_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

South Maui CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 South Maui Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

SM CWPP Plan w appendices 161229.compressed cover photo.png

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_South Maui_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

North Kona CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 North Kona Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

NKCWPP plan w appendices 161229.compressed_cover photo.png

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_North Kona_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

Molokai CWPP (2016)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 Molokai Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP).

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

MoCWPP plan w appendices 161229.compressed_Page_001.jpg

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_Molokai_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

Kauai CWPP (2016 Update)

HWMO spearheaded the effort to write and implement this 2016 Kauai Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) Update.

CWPPs are a great planning tool for communities and have become a prerequisite for receiving federal funding for wildfire protection projects. A CWPP assists a community in identifying and prioritizing areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments, and supports communities to take action. The plan assesses values at risk such as safety, natural resource protection, recreation, scenic values, and economic assets. Through a collaborative process involving input from community members, resource management and firefighting agencies, and a variety of other interested parties, CWPPs help bring wildfire hazard information and planning and action opportunities to all parties. These plans are increasingly important in Hawaii, which faces unique wildfire threats that are becoming more challenging due to increasing ignitions, drought episodes and land use changes. Wildfires have great impacts on Hawaii Island residents and natural resources, affecting:

• Daily life (road closures, traffic, evacuations, post-fire flooding, tax payer dollars)
• Human health and safety (dust, smoke, water quality, burned homes and structures, resident and firefighter safety)
• Ecosystem health and resilience (watersheds, forests, coral reefs, fisheries)
 

Official Plan:

KCWPPU plan with appendices 161226.compressed_Page_001.jpg

2-Page Summary:

2018_4_18_CWPP Concerns and Priorities Overview_Kauai Update_FINAL_HWMO_Page_1.jpg

Stakeholder Needs Word Clouds Poster

Click to expand poster.

To better understand the needs of our stakeholders across the State, we are always looking at new, innovative ways to visualize what's important to people.

For the 2015 Nahelehele Dry Forest Symposium, HWMO created a poster for the poster session that we shared with a number of individuals involved in conservation work across the State and the Pacific. 

The poster board, designed by Pablo Beimler (Education & Outreach Coordinator) and written by Pablo, Elizabeth Pickett (Executive Director), and Ilene Grossman (Planning Assistant), emphasizes the importance of collecting agency and community input before moving forward on wildfire mitigation projects. 

Here's an abstract from the poster board:

"Addressing the wildfire issues that persist on the Hawaiian Islands requires collaboration and communication among diverse parties due to the cross-field, cross-jurisdictional nature of wildfires. For years, Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization has been a model for thoroughly engaging its partners and community members in each step of the collaboration process. One of the key reasons HWMO’s projects have been relevant and successful is that the organization only moves forward on projects that are directly driven by stakeholder’s needs. HWMO makes every effort to collect input from land managers, planners, County/State/Federal agencies, local communities, and any other parties affected by wildfire in order to truly understand what is needed on-the-ground. Our display visually highlights the plethora of input we have gathered from the past couple of years, primarily through the Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) process."