For Educators

Wildfire LOOKOUT! Flyer

Wildfires are a frequent and significant hazard across Hawaii.

Help do your part by preventing wildfire and following these 14 easy action ideas to prepare your home, family, and community. 

Click to enlarge the front page of the flyer.

Click to enlarge the back page of the flyer.

Ready, Set, Go! Hawaii: Your Personal Wildland Fire Action Guide

Front cover of the booklet.

Over a year ago, we received 10,000 copies (that's 40 extremely heavy boxes) of the first ever Hawaii version of the Ready, Set, Go! Wildland Fire Action Guide. We still have a storehouse of these amazingly handy guides. 

We encourage every household and landowner/manager in the state of Hawaii to get a hold of the guide.

In this Action Guide, we hope to provide tips and tools you need to prepare for a wildland fire threat (Ready), have situational awareness when a fire starts (Set), and to evacuate early (Go!).

Features include:

  • Hawaii's Growing Wildland Fire Problem
  • Actions You Can Take Today
  • Defensible Space Creation - Hawaiian Style
  • How to Harden Your Home
  • Ready, Set, Go Action Guide Checklist for Your House and Family
  • Emergency Preparedness Kit Checklist
  • Ready, Set, Go Action Guide Checklist for Large Landowners and Land Managers
  • Emergency Contacts and Info. Worksheet
  • Our Family's Home Evacuation Plan Worksheet
  • Residential Safety Checklist
  • And More!

Contact us if you would like copies to distribute to your friends, family members, neighbors, or anyone else you can think of. We are also able to hold Ready, Set, Go! workshops upon request in your community. Stay tuned for updates on upcoming workshops and events where we will be handing out the guides. Or, come by our office in Waimea (Kamuela) where we have boxes full of the guides!

The guide was produced by Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization (HWMO), made possible through a grant from the USDA Forest Service and with the help of HWMO's partners from the Pacific Fire Exchange, Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources - Division of Forestry and Wildlife, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources of the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Fire Department, Honolulu Fire Department, Kauai Fire Department, and Maui Fire Department, in a cooperative effort with the International Association of Fire Chiefs. HWMO is an equal opportunity employer. 

This Hawaii version of the RSG Action Plan was made possible by The Cooperative Fire Program of the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, Pacific Southwest Region. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326 W. Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Mahalo to IAFC for spearheading the collaboration and arranging for and funding the massive print-job!

2017 Wildfire in Hawaii - PFX Annual Summary

Check out this brand new resource to learn how the wildfire season went in Hawaii in 2017 with this Pacific Fire Exchange fact sheet. Download the full fact sheet by clicking the button below.

"Every wildfire incident is part of a larger pattern of wildfire occurrence and is an opportunity to gain experience and insight for wildfire management. Taking a look at both the big picture and individual fires can: Deepen and expand our understanding of wildfire drivers, behavior, and response; improve wildfire response, management, and science; reduce negative impacts on individuals, communities, natural resources, and response agency budgets."

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Wildfire in Hawaii Factsheet

Did you know that the average area burned per year in Hawaii has increased 400% over the past century? Check out this Pacific Fire Exchange fact sheet that presents Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization's State Wildfire History Map and Dr. Clay Trauernichts' key findings from his research on the scale and scope of wildfire in Hawaii.

"Over the past decade, an average of >1000 wildfires burned >17,000 acres each year in Hawai‘i, with the percentage of total land area burned comparable to and often exceeding figures for the fire-prone western US (Fig. 1). Humans have caused much of the increase in wildfire threat by increasing the abundance of ignitions (Fig. 2) and introducing nonnative, fire-prone grasses and shrubs. Nonnative grasslands and shrublands now cover nearly one quarter of Hawaii's total land area and, together with a warming, drying climate and year round fire season, greatly increase the incidence of larger fires (Fig. 3), especially in leeward areas. Wildfires were once limited in Hawai‘i to active volcanic eruptions and infrequent dry lightning strikes. However, the dramatic increase in wildfire prevalence poses serious threats to human safety, infrastructure, agricultural production, cultural resources, native ecosystems, watershed functioning, and nearshore coastal resources statewide."

Hawaii Wildfire Impacts Flyer

Hawaii has a devastating wildfire problem. While under-publicized nationally, the scale and scope of wildfires in Hawaii are extreme. Take a look and please share widely!

Emergency Management Careers Infographic

 Click the infographic above to enlarge.

Click the infographic above to enlarge.

"Emergency management professionals provide the framework for our society's survival after disasters occur. Given how consistently disasters occur and the need to limit the damage from emergencies and disasters, there is now, more than ever, a need for emergency management professionals. In fact, the field is expected to steadily grow well into 2024.

The below infographic, created by Arizona State University's Online Emergency Management and Homeland Security (EMHS) degree program, explores the field of emergency management and the various professions one might pursue."

- Shared by Pearson Online Learning Services

Wildfire Virtual Field Trips

 Screen capture from NFPA video.

Screen capture from NFPA video.

Check out this video series put together by the NFPA and experience what happens one year, five years, and ten years after a major wildfire. The lessons learned from these videos focus largely on how you can take measures around your home and yard to reduce wildfire risks. One of the videos focuses on the ecological importance of wildfires on the mainland. It's important to keep in mind that in Hawaii and the Western Pacific, wildfires are NOT a part of the natural process and actually harm our native forests, watersheds, and coastlines. 

Disaster Safety & Assistive Technology: Protection for Seniors & the Disabled

Here is a resource with excellent information on how to better prepare our kupuna and the disabled for emergencies. 

From the Source:

"When disaster strikes, our first instinct is to check in with our loved ones and make sure they’re okay. But if your loved one is a senior or has a disability, you can’t afford to wait to “check in” — timing is everything during an emergency, and you need to buy them as much time as possible to react independently. You should create an emergency preparedness guide to keep them safe and accessible even as a crisis is unfolding.

Wildfire Research Fact Sheet: Decks

Firewise Fact Sheet Decks - snapshot.png

Firewise's new wildfire research fact sheet has some great information on how to reduce the ignitability of your deck or lanai. It's just one page but packed with useful information.

From the Source: 

"MANY HOMES LOCATED IN WILDFIRE-PRONE AREAS HAVE ATTACHED DECKS, WHICH CAN POTENTIALLY SPREAD FIRE TO THE HOUSE WHEN IGNITED DURING A WILDFIRE. A burning deck can ignite siding or break the glass in doors or windows, allowing fi re to gain entry into the house. Consequently, making decks less vulnerable to wildfire also makes your house less vulnerable. Reducing the deck’s vulnerability requires an approach that focuses on the materials and design features used to build the deck, and creating a noncombustible zone around and under the deck."

Climate Change Impacts on Wildfires in Hawaii

As climate change continues to reshape the lands and waters of Hawaii, wildfire will be increasingly on the radar. Climate change contributes to conditions known to increase wildfire hazard. More wildfires in Hawaii mean less native forests and drinking water and more erosion/runoff, coastal brownouts, and communities at risk. Please share this infographic far and wide and remember, there is a lot you can do to protect your family, home, and community!