For General Public

Wildfire Basics for Professionals: Hazard Reduction for Arborists and Landscapers

This 2-pager is a great reference for Arborists and Landscapers to practice firewise landscaping.

Firewise landscaping is a global phenomenon that is based on science and observations of past fires and is proven to be effective in reducing wildfire risk for residents.

As an Arborist or Landscaper, being able to reduce the ignition risk of clientsʻ homes can be a very valuable element to your product. Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization recommends being familiar with the firewise landscaping methods to help protect homes from fire, and offer this valuable tool to your resource!

Wildfire Basics for Professionals: Resiliency for Land-Use and Community Planners

This 2-pager is a great reference for land-use and community planners to put firewise concepts to use while planning for the long-term resiliency of any community that is in the planning stages.

Planners are an important part of a Fire-adapted community where informed and prepared citizens collaboratively plan and take action to safely co-exist with wildfire. Using planning methods proven to increase community survivability and resiliency during wildfires tend to be very cost effective when compared to retroactive solutions to mitigate community damages to wildfire.

We recommend all community and land-use planners take these firewise details into consideration to promote the long-term preparedness and safety of communities, especially ones located in areas of high fire risk.

Building a Wildfire Resistant Home

“A new home built to wildfire-resistant codes can be constructed for roughly the same cost as a typical home.” -Headwaters Economics

From the source:

“This study finds negligible cost differences between a typical home and a home constructed using wildfire-resistant materials and design features.”

"Four Friends of Fire" Video

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A short PSA with animated characters to educate people about the four key elements that dictate fire behavior universally.

If we're going to live with fire, we'd better get to know it. In this first installment of the series, we meet four key drivers of bushfire risk. With thanks to the University of Wollongong, the University of Melbourne, Rockshelf Productions and David Shooter.

Hawaii Wildfire Interactive Webapp

Click above to check out the HWMO Webapp

Click above to check out the HWMO Webapp

Why a Hawaii Wildfire webapp?

As an organization that serves all who live, work, or visit the Hawaiian Islands and parts of the Western Pacific, we want to make wildfire-related information readily available at your fingertips. We hope this app will be useful for you to learn more about the wildfire hazards in your own area so that you will be better equipped to take action in your community.

What does the Hawaii Wildfire webapp do?

The Hawaii Wildfire webapp visualizes wildfire data across Hawaii. It has four types of data: fire history, community hazard assessments, community input information, and census data.

Knowledge is power!

We want to say a big thank you to Niklas Lollo and Evangeline McGlynn, PhD candidates at the University of California, Berkeley, for developing the app in conjunction with Data Sciences for the 21st Century. Their hard work and dedication to this app no doubt shows in the final result.

If you have any questions or feedback, you can e-mail HWMO at admin@hawaiiwildfire.org or call (808) 885-0900.

Wildfire LOOKOUT! Flyer

Click to enlarge the front page of the flyer.

Click to enlarge the front page of the flyer.

Wildfires are a frequent and significant hazard across Hawaii.

Help do your part by preventing wildfire and following these 14 easy action ideas to prepare your home, family, and community. 

Ready, Set, Go! Hawaii: Your Personal Wildland Fire Action Guide

Front cover of the booklet.

Front cover of the booklet.

Over a year ago, we received 10,000 copies (that's 40 extremely heavy boxes) of the first ever Hawaii version of the Ready, Set, Go! Wildland Fire Action Guide. We still have a storehouse of these amazingly handy guides. 

We encourage every household and landowner/manager in the state of Hawaii to get a hold of the guide.

In this Action Guide, we hope to provide tips and tools you need to prepare for a wildland fire threat (Ready), have situational awareness when a fire starts (Set), and to evacuate early (Go!).

Features include:

  • Hawaii's Growing Wildland Fire Problem

  • Actions You Can Take Today

  • Defensible Space Creation - Hawaiian Style

  • How to Harden Your Home

  • Ready, Set, Go Action Guide Checklist for Your House and Family

  • Emergency Preparedness Kit Checklist

  • Ready, Set, Go Action Guide Checklist for Large Landowners and Land Managers

  • Emergency Contacts and Info. Worksheet

  • Our Family's Home Evacuation Plan Worksheet

  • Residential Safety Checklist

  • And More!

Contact us if you would like copies to distribute to your friends, family members, neighbors, or anyone else you can think of. We are also able to hold Ready, Set, Go! workshops upon request in your community. Stay tuned for updates on upcoming workshops and events where we will be handing out the guides. Or, come by our office in Waimea (Kamuela) where we have boxes full of the guides!

The guide was produced by Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization (HWMO), made possible through a grant from the USDA Forest Service and with the help of HWMO's partners from the Pacific Fire Exchange, Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources - Division of Forestry and Wildlife, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources of the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Fire Department, Honolulu Fire Department, Kauai Fire Department, and Maui Fire Department, in a cooperative effort with the International Association of Fire Chiefs. HWMO is an equal opportunity employer. 

This Hawaii version of the RSG Action Plan was made possible by The Cooperative Fire Program of the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, Pacific Southwest Region. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326 W. Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Mahalo to IAFC for spearheading the collaboration and arranging for and funding the massive print-job!

2017 Wildfire in Hawaii - PFX Annual Summary

Check out this brand new resource to learn how the wildfire season went in Hawaii in 2017 with this Pacific Fire Exchange fact sheet. Download the full fact sheet by clicking the button below.

"Every wildfire incident is part of a larger pattern of wildfire occurrence and is an opportunity to gain experience and insight for wildfire management. Taking a look at both the big picture and individual fires can: Deepen and expand our understanding of wildfire drivers, behavior, and response; improve wildfire response, management, and science; reduce negative impacts on individuals, communities, natural resources, and response agency budgets."

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Wildfire in Hawaii Factsheet

Did you know that the average area burned per year in Hawaii has increased 400% over the past century? Check out this Pacific Fire Exchange fact sheet that presents Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization's State Wildfire History Map and Dr. Clay Trauernichts' key findings from his research on the scale and scope of wildfire in Hawaii.

"Over the past decade, an average of >1000 wildfires burned >17,000 acres each year in Hawai‘i, with the percentage of total land area burned comparable to and often exceeding figures for the fire-prone western US (Fig. 1). Humans have caused much of the increase in wildfire threat by increasing the abundance of ignitions (Fig. 2) and introducing nonnative, fire-prone grasses and shrubs. Nonnative grasslands and shrublands now cover nearly one quarter of Hawaii's total land area and, together with a warming, drying climate and year round fire season, greatly increase the incidence of larger fires (Fig. 3), especially in leeward areas. Wildfires were once limited in Hawai‘i to active volcanic eruptions and infrequent dry lightning strikes. However, the dramatic increase in wildfire prevalence poses serious threats to human safety, infrastructure, agricultural production, cultural resources, native ecosystems, watershed functioning, and nearshore coastal resources statewide."

Hawaii Wildfire Impacts Flyer

Hawaii has a devastating wildfire problem. While under-publicized nationally, the scale and scope of wildfires in Hawaii are extreme. Take a look and please share widely!